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logo of cancer III. Important Points for Theoretical Analysis of Carcinogenesis
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(8) Theoretical Analysis of Anchorage Dependence

Theoretical analysis of anchorage dependence enables us to indicate the difference in mechanism between a normal and a cancer cell. A normal cell at cell division shows anchorage dependence; however, a cancer cell at cell division does not show it. This is the most important different point between a normal and a cancer cell. Interestingly, theoretical analysis of anchorage dependence enables us to indicate a new point of view toward cellular function as follows: “A cell showing anchorage dependence does not have three-dimensional stability.”

A normal cell can theoretically be considered to obtain three-dimensional stability by attaching to a solid plate. When a cell divides itself, it needs three-dimensional stability to expand the volume. However, a normal cell does not contain movement having three-dimensional stability, and cannot start cell division for itself. Thus, a normal cell needs to obtain a polarity by attaching to a solid plate. This polarity allows a normal cell to fix the internal movement, and then to obtain three-dimensional stability. As a result, a normal cell attaching to a solid plate can start dividing itself. This reveals that a normal cell contains movement not having three-dimensional stability.

On the other hand, a cancer cell can be considered to contain movement having three-dimensional stability from the birth. A cell attaching to a solid plate obtains a polarity, which allows the cell to fix the internal movement and to obtain three-dimensional stability. Then this cell starts dividing itself. However, a cancer cell can divide itself without attaching to a solid plate. These reasons enable us to indicate that a cancer cell, different from a normal cell, contains movement having three-dimensional stability unless it attaches to a solid plate.

In summary, a normal and a cancer cell can be considered to contain different-dimensional movements. Movement having three-dimensional stability is only three-dimensional one. Furthermore, a normal cell does not have three-dimensional stability; in contrast, a cancer cell has it. These reasons allow us to conclude as follows: “Whereas a normal cell contains movement controlled by one or two-dimensional movement, a cancer cell contains movement controlled by three-dimensional movement.”

Fig11. Theoretical analysis
of anchorage dependence

Points:
1. Whereas a normal cell does not have three-dimensional stability, a cancer cell has it. This is the most important different points between a normal and a cancer cell.
2. Whereas a normal cell does not contain movement controlled by three-dimensional movement, a cancer cell contains movement controlled by three-dimensional movement.

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