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logo of outline VI. Carcinogenesis 1/2
Consider theoretically the different points between benign and malignant tumor.
1/2 | 2/2

1. Definition of carcinogenesis
Carcinogenesis can be considered to occur as follows: "when a tissue causes strong tissue distortion, it causes cancer at the peak of the tissue distortion." Although the definition of carcinogenesis is almost the same as that of general tumorigenesis which has already explained in the preceding section, there is an important different theoretical point between benign and malignant tumorigenesis. This different point is "the depth of tissue distortion," which divides tumorigenesis between benign and malignant one.

In order to understand why the depth of tissue distortion plays a major role in dividing a tumor between a benign and a malignant tumor, check the following two points. The first is the difference in momentum between a normal and a cancer cell. The second is "Biological Distance," which is useful for us to explain the difference in biological character between different cells. Indeed, using these two points enables us to understand why depth of tissue distortion divides a tumor between a benign and a malignant one.


2. Difference in momentum between a benign-tumor and a malignant-tumor cell
Analyzing mouse skin carcinogenesis induced by tar, which is one of the representative experimental carcinogeneses, allows us to indicate the difference in momentum between a benign-tumor and a malignant-tumor cell. Tar has two chemical properties: those of an initiator and a promoter, and a promoter has the ability to raise the momentum in a tissue. In addition, when we paint tar on mouse skin for a long time, we can firstly induce papillomas: benign tumors. Even after we continue painting Tar on the mouse skin, we can next induce papilloblastomas: malignant tumors. These reasons lead us to point out that a cancer cell contains a large amount of momentum compared with a benign-tumor cell and with a normal cell.

(On the process of mouse skin carcinogenesis induced by Tar, benign tumors appear before malignant ones appear. This reveals that a cancer cell contains a large amount of momentum compared with a normal cell.)

3. Difference in biological distance among a normal, a benign-tumor, and a malignant-tumor cell
The conclusion above also enables us to explain the relationship among a normal, a benign, and a malignant cell. A papilloma cell contains a large amount of momentum compared with a normal cell; in addition, a papilloblastoma cell contains a large amount of momentum compared with a papilloma cell. Thus, when we express "momentum contained in a cell" as length, we can explain the relationship among a normal, a benign, and a malignant cell as follows. "The distance between a normal and a papilloma cell is short less than that between a normal and a papilloblastoma cell." I call just this distance "Biological Distance." The figure below illustrates this mechanism.

(Using the concept of "Biological Distance" enables us to express the relationship among a normal, a benign tumor, and a malignant tumor cell.)

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